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Family Law Archives

How to Co-Parent

During a divorce, it seems like nothing can be harder than separating from your spouse and ending a marriage. However, often successfully raising your children with your ex-spouse can seem as hard, if not harder, than the actual divorce. Here are six tips from the family law attorneys at Platt Hopwood on how to successfully co-parent your children:

4 things to keep in mind when talking to your child about consent for the first time

Some would say that it is never too early to speak to your child about consent. To adults it might seem like an all-too-common term, but the concept of consent is often quite unfamiliar to children.

3 ways to make the holidays smoother after a divorce or breakup

Almost everyone's been there: the first holiday season after a breakup or divorce. From family Christmas dinner to the New Year's ball drop, nothing is going to feel quite the same. Worse yet, you're worried about the questions from family members who just don't get it. Will they ask where your ex is, or criticize you for ending the relationship?

Co-Parenting During the Holidays

Making decisions about your child's education after divorce

Your child's education is important. Who gets to make critical decisions about school?

In a recent post, we discussed some back-to-school tips for co-parents. We talked about the importance of prioritizing your child's education and working with your ex to make sure the school year is a success.

Six back-to-school tips for co-parents

Study up on these pointers for a peaceful school year.

Going back to school can be a rude awakening for children after a summer of sleeping late and hanging out at the beach. But it is also a time of transition for parents, particularly those who share child custody and parenting time.

The Legality of Spying

During a divorce, child custody or family law battle it may be tempting to channel your inner Nancy Drew and engage in a little spying on your spouse or ex-spouse in an attempt to give yourself a leg-up in court. Some of these methods are legal, however most of them are not and there is a fine line between legal, inadmissible in court and illegal. Whether you are attempting to find out whether your spouse or ex-spouse is hiding assets, having an affair or violating your final judgment it is easy to get yourself into a tricky situation when playing detective. Before you take any action to spy on your spouse, consult your attorney to figure out if what you plan will behoove or destroy your case in court.

Dangers of Social Media During a Lawsuit

Social media seems to run into every aspect of modern lives with the rise in mobile technology and social sites such as Facebook and Instagram. These social media sites are often utilized as fun tools to reconnect with old friends or keep in touch with current ones. However, lurking behind the fun of social media is great potential to damage your case in a divorce, custody or alimony battle. The opposing party may use your statuses, posts and photos as evidence in trial. If you are going through a legal battle stop and think before you post or before you allow someone to tag you in a post, "If a judge saw this post or photograph and nothing else, would this harm, benefit or have a neutral impact on my case?"

Relocation of Children in a Timesharing Agreement

Shared parenting plans may be difficult enough to maintain without one parent considering moving. Some parents may assume that since they are the custodial parent they have the right to move with the children. This is false. Relocating with children, or moving more than 50 miles away from the previous residence for at least 60 days with a minor child who is subject to timesharing with another parent, requires court approval. If you have questions regarding relocating with your children contact our office to schedule a consultation with one of our family law attorneys.

How to Survive and Thrive in Court

Typically there are long months of motions, mediations and prep before two parties have their day in court. The date of the trial may seem far away at times, but it can creep up faster than expected. Odds are that the impending trial has your stomach in knots and your stress at the maximum level. Here are a few basic tips for your day in court.