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Divorce Archives

How to Co-Parent

During a divorce, it seems like nothing can be harder than separating from your spouse and ending a marriage. However, often successfully raising your children with your ex-spouse can seem as hard, if not harder, than the actual divorce. Here are six tips from the family law attorneys at Platt Hopwood on how to successfully co-parent your children:

The Legality of Spying

During a divorce, child custody or family law battle it may be tempting to channel your inner Nancy Drew and engage in a little spying on your spouse or ex-spouse in an attempt to give yourself a leg-up in court. Some of these methods are legal, however most of them are not and there is a fine line between legal, inadmissible in court and illegal. Whether you are attempting to find out whether your spouse or ex-spouse is hiding assets, having an affair or violating your final judgment it is easy to get yourself into a tricky situation when playing detective. Before you take any action to spy on your spouse, consult your attorney to figure out if what you plan will behoove or destroy your case in court.

Relocation of Children in a Timesharing Agreement

Shared parenting plans may be difficult enough to maintain without one parent considering moving. Some parents may assume that since they are the custodial parent they have the right to move with the children. This is false. Relocating with children, or moving more than 50 miles away from the previous residence for at least 60 days with a minor child who is subject to timesharing with another parent, requires court approval. If you have questions regarding relocating with your children contact our office to schedule a consultation with one of our family law attorneys.

How to Survive and Thrive in Court

Typically there are long months of motions, mediations and prep before two parties have their day in court. The date of the trial may seem far away at times, but it can creep up faster than expected. Odds are that the impending trial has your stomach in knots and your stress at the maximum level. Here are a few basic tips for your day in court.

What to do if your Ex-Spouse is Not Paying Child Support

As always, our first piece of advice is to contact and retain an attorney that you trust. In Florida child support is not a right of the parent, it is a right of the child; each parent has a legal obligation to provide for their minor child or children. Child support ensures that the child's basic needs, such as food, shelter and safety are met and allows the child to benefit from both parent's success and good fortune. The court will determine child support based on a formula that takes into account the child custody agreement, the net income of the parents, daycare costs and additional specified expenses.

Alimony

Title VI Chapter 61.08 in the Florida Statues details alimony awarded in a divorce, including the types of alimony and the factors the court takes into consideration when awarding alimony. An online copy of this statue can be found here.